An Extraordinary Podcast on the YDB Event: Hancock and Carlson on Joe Rogan

podcast

Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson were guests on an extraordinary 3-Hour episode of the Joe Rogan Experience podcast on Thursday, November 19. The Joe Rogan Experience, one of the world’s most popular podcasts, attracts “TV-like” audiences of more than 11 million listeners a month. Rogan says in his interview intro that people were ‘skipping work’ and having ‘house parties’ to catch this show, so it was a particularly well-anticipated episode.

The podcast was almost entirely dedicated to the YDB event and is the most comprehensive and informative popular presentation of the subject to date. This kind of popular attention to our subject is simply wonderful. Enjoy:

And on YouTube:

  • Steve Garcia

    First of all, THANKS, George, for getting this up here. Big time thanks!

    Okay, slowly digesting what they are talking about in the video.

    I am all of 6:09 into it, and already I’ve got tons of comments to make but can’t do it here. It would overwhelm the readership and drive them away!

    But one comment for the moment, and hoping others chime in:

    At 5:46 IMHO they are misinterpreting the wave ripples from that flood in Georgia. Those ripples are from the tail end of the event – the last, and very slow-flowing runoff of the flood waters. They are pointing at the right things and not analyzing them correctly. I have put a lot of time into looking into drumlins and eskers, and I think I understand them in the context of a catstrophic event. And that is WAAAAY different from what the orthodoxy has to say about drumlins and eskers.

    Those ripples at 5:46 are ESKERS, small scale eskers. And NOT from glaciers and not from scabland-type floods. We have to be aware that the LAST action is the one that leaves its mark, at that scale. Glaciologists recognise this, that what they see is the last action, which has erased the evidence of earlier actions. In this case, the SAND was deposited by the flood, lifted from the creek in the first action, then when the turbulence had slowed enough, the sand precipitated out, landing on the ground, while the water was still there, and THEN the last slow, receding flow created the ripples.

    Now, on the Camas Prairie, the violence of the floods had vertical turbulence, which DOES cause ripples on the bottom of creeks – WHEN THEY ARE CONSTANT AND DO IT OVER SOME AMOUNT OF TIME. In creeks that can vary, depending on the volume of water coming down, so the ripples shift. Maybe in a particular stretch they even change the number of ripples, due to resonance and velocities. More volume = more velocity. You see that in wind tunnels and their turbulence patterns, which are NOT fully chaotic but are affected by resonance. The vortexes in the Gulf Stream off N America show the same kinds of resonance.

    When we scale DOWN the actions of the Scablands and Missoula floods to beach size or creek size, do the same things happen due to the great velocity at the height of the flooding? It is the LAST flows that matter, in terms of the evidence we can see. We can’t see the early patterns – they get overwritten by the later ones, and the last one gets seen by us in the present.

    So, I posit that the Camas Prairie ripples are NOT from the really big part of the flood but the more lazy-flowing of the end of the flood. I think the big flood pushed everything around, but that the last stage was like a finishing plasterer, putting swirl patterns in the plaster.

    And THAT gives an even more impressive picture of what the BIG rush of water was like, because if even the tail-end flows could do ripples 10-20 feet high, holy crap!

    …just sayin’…

  • Steve Garcia

    At about 3:32, GH begins talking about the erratic boulders near Wenatchee. I smiled at this, because I have my own erratic boulders I’m studying that look and feel the same. The Wenatchee boulders are huge and so are mine, on the Baltic coast. The surface of theirs are severely eroded by freeze-thaw cycles and the type of basaltic rock they are made of. But look at the overall shapes of most of them, and their forms are ROUND. Consider that if the puny freeze-thaw cycle process can mess up their surfaces so badly in 13,000 years, what damage/wear they must have sustained in getting thrown across the landscape by massive amounts of waters.

    And massive amounts of waters they were. The sverdrup’s “million cubic meters per second” that JR talks about is maybe more simply put as a cube of 100 meters on a side – per second. JR’s sverdrup is a HUGE amount of water. The Florida current is 30 sverdrups, growing to 150 sverdrups off the coast of Newfoundland. Amazing how that entrains so much more water when it gets out into the open ocean.

    Anyway, all that water can and DOES carry huge boulders. This was something that Agassiz and Lyell could not comprehend – boulders of that size, moved by WATER. Agassiz’s “ice age” gave Lyell exactly what he NEEDED to shoot down the Biblical Flood of Noah – SOME way to explain away things that had been seen only possible by water. But Lyell and Agassiz, in ~1845 had no way of knowing about the Scablands.

    I posit that the erratic boulders on the Baltic coast were moved in the same manner – by water and not by glacial action. I am even betting on it.

    See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glacial_erratic_boulders_of_Estonia. Some of those are even larger than Joe’s Wenatchee ones…

    Ehalkivi (Sunset Glow Boulder) near Letipea is the largest erratic boulder in the glaciation area of North Europe. It has a height of 7 m, circumference of 48.2 m, a volume of 930 m3 and a mass of approximately 2,500 tonnes. . .
    …Some particular large ones have been found in the sea, including some near Osmussaar that are 100 metres diameter. The Osmussaar boulders are believed to have been pushed there by glaciers from the Neugrund meteorite crater.

    They place the Neugrund crater to 470 Mya. Don’t bet on it.

    If my math is right, the undersea erratics in the Baltic weigh about 700,000 tonnes (about 760,000 tons). Making Joe’s a pebble. Think mega-tsunami.

    Here is one that looks very much like the Wenatchee boulders: http://www.sandatlas.org/wp-content/uploads/Rapakivi-Vyborgite1.jpg

    So, another similarity of the Baltic erratics with the Wenatchee ones. Hahaha – even though the Baltic ones are right next to the water (and under it), they are labeled GLACIAL.

    Now, GH does assert that glaciers carried it. I don’t understand that. Yes or no? Glacial or Scablands flood, GH?

    At http://www.sandatlas.org/sand/ they write:

    The average size of grains is determined by the energy of the transport medium. Higher current velocity (either stream flow or sea waves) can carry heavier load. Coarse-grained sediments therefore reveal that they were influenced by energetic medium because finer material is carried away.

    So, when none of us has ever even seen rocks larger than PEBBLES moved by water action, try to envisions what HUGE volumes and current velocities had to happen to transport 18,000 ton or 760,000 ton rocks.

  • Yeah seconded, George that was a good one. I don’t recall learning anything, but was intrigued with the psychological denial aspect because it truly is a strange human phenomena. I’ve never read a Graham Hancock book, guess I’ll have to wait for the super cheap used version. How did the shining reviews come out on the same date of release? Well,hopefully it will perpetuate the cause. All my efforts on my book seem to be lost into a black hole, granted, I took it to the limit and I am just reporting what I found. At least they mentioned the Pleiades, ya’ll know the story throughout time that can’t possibly be true. Anybody else notice, not one mention of the Carolina Bays? I recently set up a face hook page and started looking around and ran into Schoch’s and he doesn’t believe in them either if I read it correctly. To me it looks like the camp split wherein one side believes in the comet but somehow it cools without striking and heats up when in water… Or maybe strikes the Sun and it fluctuates thus effecting the Earth’s climate… There is a hint of a comet striking the Sun in the Pyramid Texts, but all my notes crashed and I’m not in the mood to re-read all that stuff again.

    Here is something I’ve been kicking around for some time now. While reading Ragnarok by Ignatius Donnelly he talks about well diggers finding wood and grass in certain states just south of the Great Lakes, I can’t recall which or where within, I chalked it up like giant bones when reading and didn’t write it down in my notes. Anyhow, it would be interesting to ask modern well drillers in those areas to see if the stories are true. One would think that the outer limits of the ice sheet would be pushed upon impact and thus plow the soil south. There is a myth that says the Gods intentionally buried the game animals to deprive Man of food in North America.

    Which brings up another thing. Isn’t there a place in Alaska that they wash out mammoth bones that were all buried at once. IIRC George knows and why is George so silent on his own Blog? lol gonna get myself in more trouble. BTW, George, lets see a close up of the meteorite on the table.

  • Cevin Q

    Bard,
    Just ordered your book from amazon,
    I look forward to reading it.

  • NO WAY LOL I think that makes 5. I sent out at least 12 to people I thought would be interested and haven’t heard a peep. I need someone or as many as possible to give it a review on Good reads, Amazon, or where ever. All I ask is be truthful good bad I don’t care. I was thinking of making up a contest to win a copy, but everywhere I go I get dead silence if not knee jerk hostility. Thanks ! BTW, does anyone know how to set up credit cards for my Google Sites or any site I guess would help. I asked my bank and got nothing, I searched online and found nothing, about the only thing I haven’t tried is call MasterCard and Visa. I have a PayPal but can’t figure it out or haven’t had time to find out how to implement it onto the site. At least if I can sell them on my site Amazon will follow suit on cost, they keep inching up the cost, plus I’ll make more than $Seven. Money doesn’t really matter, it just really confuses me how I can put something together that billions of people have yet to do and nothing…

  • Cevin Q

    Bard,
    I will recommend it some people I know who are into things of that nature.
    I realized I had a gift cert for amazon, so I figured that would be a good way to use it. I bought a new copy BTW, so at least you’ll see the $7.

  • David L Ulrich

    I’ve also put your book on the Amazon to buy list – i’m no longer interested in the pat story I was force fed in school.

  • Cool, I hope everyone likes it. I’m sure most will find it disturbing, I was continually blown away researching it. It was as if the more I dug the more shocking it became. I still can’t come to grips as to why it is not common knowledge. Maybe everyone is straddling the fence with each foot firmly planted and continually proclaiming to being scientific and yet can’t put both feet into the paradigm shift.

  • Interesting follow-up to the story a month or two ago of “structures” being observed around a star. Best explanation now appears to be destruction of a family of comets. The way this is written, it could be what the YD-object looked like from outside the system as it fragmented and started impacting the terrestrial planets. Happy Thanksgiving –

    http://phys.org/news/2015-11-astronomers-comet-fragments-explanation-mysterious.html

  • Cevin Q

    Agimarc,
    After reading your post I had a thought. The system in question sees a dimming of some 22%.
    If that is analogous to the break up of the taurid progenitor, and that break up happened inside of the earths orbit, the consequences of the dimming of the suns output would be disastrous.

  • Cevin Q

    I would comment more thoroughly, but I’m between bands at a punk rock show with Guttermouth.

  • Cevin Q

    Bard,
    The book arrived yesterday, and I am diving into it today.

  • Cevin Q – Good, there is an email at the bottom of my site, let me know what you think or maybe questions.
    https://sites.google.com/site/fromthedeepoceanabove/ I also put up the Bibliography and am working on extracts to give others an idea what it contains.

  • Steve Garcia

    I just today discovered that Google Earth Pro has been FREE of charge since January. I use it a lot for things here n the Tusk, and I presume everyone else would be at least interested in downloading and installing it. It used to cost $400 PER YEAR. And now it is free.

    I am not sure yet, but I think that in order to use some of the advanced tools you need to sign in using your Google userID and password.

    To download, go to http://www.google.com/intl/en/earth/download/gep/agree.html

    My install was a little glitchy, but while I was fretting it seems top have installed fully. I didn’t get a shortcut on my Desktop, so I thought the install went wrong. But it seems to be okay now.

    I have no idea exactly what the advanced tools are, but maybe some are useful to Tuskers everywhere…

  • Steve – Thanks, I didn’t see much change in Google Earth, same couple of year old images. Ran into this http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150917091401.htm Something about Australian Aborigine myths going back to a time before the rise of the sea level, but they want $225 to read it. I also found a myth that I missed about the Australian Rainbow Serpent that “explains how the Wolfe Creek Crater, or Kandimalal, was created by a star falling from heaven, creating a crater in which a Rainbow Serpent took up residence, though in some versions it is the Serpent which falls from heaven and creates the crater.” Sanday, Peggy Reeves (2007). Aboriginal Paintings of the Wolfe Creek Crater: Track of the Rainbow Serpent.

  • Cevin Q

    Bard,

    I have a copy of that pdf some where, I’ll track that down, I know ive got it, on the phone or laptop or workstaion I just haven’t put it in my drop box yet.
    and a paper on aboriginal witnessing of impacts.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/yntbl7een2ui1l4/Aboriginal%20Oral%20Traditions%20of%20Australian%20Impact%20Craters.pdf?dl=0

    I’m not sure if I have posted these links,

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/p3b7t48f3fe9282/Masse_2007_ICSU_Paper.pdf?dl=0

    and masse’ other paper on mythology

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/nu24f735ofto428/Masse_2007_ExploringNatureMyth%20paper.pdf?dl=0

    BTM, I’m a 1/4 of the way into the book, I like the content very much. I have found some parallels among some of the mythologies that I have read, and some of the the work you used is also very usefull in an anthropological sense, in how it pertains to the peopling of the Americas.

    Normally I would have finished it by now, but I have a new puppy in that needs a LOT of minding and she’s cutting into my reading time.

  • Cevin Q

    Bard,
    I was in error, I too hit the paywall,

    but here is the abstract.

    ABSTRACT

    Stories belonging to Australian Aboriginal groups tell of a time when the former coastline of mainland Australia was inundated by rising sea level. Stories are presented from 21 locations from every part of this coastline. In most instances it is plausible to assume that these stories refer to events that occurred more than about 7000 years ago, the approximate time at which the sea level reached its present level around Australia. They therefore provide empirical corroboration of postglacial sea-level rise. For each of the 21 locations, the minimum water depth (below the present sea level) needed for the details of the particular group of local-area stories to be true is calculated. This is then compared with the sea-level envelope for Australia (Lewis et al., Quaternary Science Reviews 74, 2013), and maximum and minimum ages for the most recent time that these details could have been observed are calculated. This method of dating Aboriginal stories shows that they appear to have endured since 7250–13 070 cal years bp (5300–11 120 bc). The implications of this extraordinary longevity of oral traditions are discussed, including those aspects of Aboriginal culture that ensured effective transgenerational communication and the possibility that traditions of comparable antiquity may exist in similar cultures.”

    and here is a decent discussion on it from a site I peruse (WARNING: its full of nutters)

    http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread1084822/pg1#pid19829751

  • Cevin Q – That 1st paper was great till the missing page 21, no biggie I could see where it was going. I’ll have to re-read it someday and take notes. A lot of it had many key aspects to it like Catfish, Lizard, Serpent, came out of the Sun, the Devil, Iron and one about the hidden or shadowed stars (Most probably the Pleiades instead of their other guesses.) of death, but it is all discounted as corrupted by white men and thus should be not listened to. Thanks, I’ll go through the rest asap and maybe find someone who downloaded the paper I was talking about that was said to be free for a limited time.

    As to the book, thanks, maybe you should read some of those old books in the bibliography, I only used the parts that pertain to the story I’m trying to show, but there is much more within them. Like the paper above, that is basically how I got really into this, I was looking for petroglyphs of the Barriger Crater impact because I don’t believe the Indigenous American is remotely recent even no matter what the geneticists or archaeologist say. Same thing with their idea that Norwegians are recently from India, BS! There is no way Man evolves that fast.

  • Steve Garcia

    Bard –

    Google Earth Pro has quite a few more tools to use. It’s more powerful. It’s up to us to learn for ourselves what those are and how we can use them.

  • Steve Garcia

    I found this on the Washington Post, that some scientists are tying the Deccan Traps to the Chicxulub KT dinosaur killer comet…
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/10/01/scientists-suggest-a-new-earth-shaking-twist-on-the-demise-of-the-dinosaurs/

    That leads to this: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/350/6256/76

    ABSTRACTBolide impact and flood volcanism compete as leading candidates for the cause of terminal-Cretaceous mass extinctions. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar data indicate that these two mechanisms may be genetically related, and neither can be considered in isolation. The existing Deccan Traps magmatic system underwent a state shift approximately coincident with the Chicxulub impact and the terminal-Cretaceous mass extinctions, after which ~70% of the Traps’ total volume was extruded in more massive and more episodic eruptions. Initiation of this new regime occurred within ~50,000 years of the impact, which is consistent with transient effects of impact-induced seismic energy. Postextinction recovery of marine ecosystems was probably suppressed until after the accelerated volcanism waned.

    I find it kind of ludicrous that they say that 50,000 years is within the change period of an impact.

    Take THAT van Hoesel!

    We’ve still got 37,184 years left for the YDB to cause changes!

    No, we don’t. But we don’t get only like 3.1 years like van Hoesel seems to think, either.

    The Dead Clade Walking thing was claimed to reach out for a million years after an extinction event, which is even more ridiculous, even if the principle seems quite sound.

    Proportion proportion proportion….

    Though, IMHO, the Dead Clade Walking thing on the dinosaurs could have been applicable – leaving the dinosaurs on their last legs for quite a while. 50,000 years for biological delayed reactions on extinctions sounds not terribly ridiculous. 50,000 years for geological changes sounds like an extraordinary claim, which would need some extraordinary proof.

    I’d question their ability to nail the Deccan Traps to any 50,000 year window, in the first place. It sounds like unachievable precision to me.

    Still, I DO think the Deccan Traps just may possibly tie in with the KT impact. Not necessarily, but possible.

    And in that regard this paper should be good news to the YDB team. Someone else arguing for impact-related effects – geological effects, no less! – is not a bad precedent.

    Every little bit helps.

    This is 35 years from Luis and Walter Alvarez’s KT hypothesis – not bad at all. Faster than Wegener!

    Not even an entire career! WOW! Does science move quickly!

  • I agree Steve, that is a lot of hemorrhaging without any trauma. I wonder if that X-Mas 2005 tsunami fault under the India Ocean is close to the diametric, cause the Deccan Traps are 37 degrees off, but that could have been a soft spot and got hit twice quickly by the resonant waves meeting and reverberating back out. Maybe the herbivores ate all the plants and then the carnivores ate the weak staving herbivorous and then turned on each other. I watched a You Tube show last night to do something other than read text and it was about how Man got the idea to draw two dimensional cave art in its inception… It is strange how some experts come to conclusions. Not once did they ever mention that Man probably drew in the dirt to help communication with his fellow hunters or travelers for directions or other hard to convey concepts. Like the time I trained a legal green card Mexican to do a trade and I had to resort to drawing what to do on concrete walls because my Spanish was wanting. We both learned each others language some what that way and there was no bilingual help on the job site.

  • BTW, he use to call me claudo pensar which I assume means clear inventor/thinker?

  • I just got done reading a Robert Schoch article from New Dawn Magazine and I had no idea he was so into the plasma electrical causation. Also, Anthony L. Peratt and plasma discharges. I must admit I haven’t read anything about this phenomena and perplexed. Can someone give me a run down on what they are talking about or a short article that sums it up. Is this something that I have totally missed? Has anyone witnessed one of these? Where do they occur? In space between the planets? The atmosphere? In the laboratory? I looked at the images and don’t know what I’m looking at. Is it suppose to happen above the magnetic pole? I should have stuck with Cevin Q’s articles, but I got sidetracked.

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