Kerr Watch

Elapsed time since Richard Kerr failed to inform his Science readers of the confirmation of nanodiamonds at the YDB: 5 years, 11 months, and 11 days

Awkward but promising: Compromise paper from Andronikov & Van Hoesel

screen-shot-2016-09-11-at-12-01-14-am

The presence of a possible meteoritic component in the same sediments suggests that an ET event occurred at approximately the same time. However, whether the presence of the meteoritic component is due to a local meteorite impact/airburst or to a much stronger event remains unclear. Anyway, it is quite possible that some short and dramatic event took place just before the onset of the Younger Dryas climate oscillation, but, as was emphasized by Haynes et al. (2010), an understanding of what happened at c. 12.9– 12.8 ka BP requires further research.

Download (PDF, 976KB)

 

Close to home

 

Regular readers of the Tusk know we don’t dwell here on modern day cosmic interactions. But that was yesterday. Today a best buddy and long-time co-worker, Worth Creech, came into my office shocked to report….he had actually seen…..a daytime fireball in Raleigh!

Well, I’ll bee. The Tar Heel State had an encounter with the incredible. Worth, and the moms, dads and kids at soccer practice, watched slack jawed as a bolide streaked across our state at the fringe of atmosphere to explode over eastern North Carolina Wednesday afternoon.

It surprised me that the media coverage of the encounter was so relatively light. I had always believed that daytime fireballs result in brief — but intense — local press. The Raleigh Fireball of 2016 was barely noted, demonstrating how uncomfortably common such interactions must be.

creech

Worth Creech

B&W

img_7484-3

Multi-ringed depressions beneath Hudson Bay imitate impact craters

Screenshot 2016-08-01 19.55.39

 

Download (PDF, 1.29MB)