Exploring abrupt climate change and pandemic induced by comets and asteroids during human history

Global dads decline then plummet after Younger Dryas comet impact

Complex systems rob earth of fathers

Tusk buddy Antonio Zamora tipped me off to the paper below revealing that a global loss of genetic males coincides exactly with the comet impact at ~12,882. Tony does an indispensable job surfacing literature highly relevant to the Younger Dryas Impact. I had missed the stunning 2015 gene paper.

Following the depth of the greatest climate crisis in human history, earth’s female-to-male ratio began a dive to 17 females to one male.

Full graph here

Full paper: Karmin et al. 2020 A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture

To help explain the sudden collapse of breeding men, the authors unfortunately ignore the well published evidence for a cosmic impact, and make an awkward claim (for the mainstream) that a global diffusion of some unknown cultural/tech meme spread ’round the earth — and all the dads were gone.

The 100 authors speculate about a cause with a parenthetical reference to missing padres due to the “invention of the wheel,” and “open water sailing:”

Innovations in transportation technology (e.g., the invention of the wheel, horse and camel domestication, and open water sailing) might have contributed to this pattern. Likely, the effect we observe is due to a combination of culturally driven increased male variance in offspring number within demes and an increased male-specific variance among demes, perhaps enhanced by increased sex-biased migration patterns () and male-specific cultural inheritance of fitness.

That’s a really odd paragraph in an important paper. For better or worse, there is no peer-reviewed evidence of the “wheel” or “open water sailing” prior to, at the start, during, or following the Younger Dryas — for more than 5000 years. Such claims are stuff for Atlanteans. Strangely, the authors reach for more speculative elements of the yet to be revealed YD story, such as precursor civilizations. But in this paper at the expense of the well supported Younger Dryas Impact.

When I first wrote this post, and tweeted it, I heard back from other YDI proponents who were reluctant to believe the YDI was responsible for the dad crash. First they pointed out that the total collapse followed the YDI by nearly two thousand years; and second, the missing males may have been born and alive after the comet impact, but sidelined from reproduction by a global shift towards “harem formation.”

This is worthy speculation, but the first objection seems to leave out, that while more modest than the ultimate downturn, RIGHT AT the initiation of the Younger Dryas (i.e. comet impact) the males begin to recede for the first time in genetic history. So perhaps the ultimate crash was a “tipping point” for an accentuation of the initial cause of the decline?

The second objection is certainly on the table, but does not preclude a comet cause. It also begs several questions. Why was the entire globe suddenly overcome with harem formation? And how on earth did the 1/17 of male parents dominate the rest so thoroughly — around the world?

It is also tough to understand why Karmin et al. failed to properly cite — even to dismiss — the much better published YDI. They could have listed dozens of papers providing a milestone event that may have catalyzed the unexplained demasculinization…but instead they make uncited speculation from the gray literature.

The authors are both timid — and wild — at the same time.

 

 

 

 

5 Responses

  1. By the way, Y DNA is much more variable than mt DNA. So you can extend the population reduction to women as well.

    For the Odessa Impact and the Brenham Impact, the effects appear to have been local. For the Brenham Impact, I could not find any Native American memories that survived, aside from a possible report from the Five Nations Of course, so many people died in the conquest, this may simply be a case of survival. I have a nice collection of Osage memories yet to go through sitting on my shelf, and of course, a tidy sum of money would help this process along. Have I mentioned before that I am running for a Nobel Prize for spotting the production of gamma rays in large hyper velocity impacts?

  2. George,
    This was alluded to in a paper from about 5-6 years ago.
    That paper was specifically looking at a population bottleneck in the middle bronze age (~2200bc/4,2 kilo year event). That group found that 14/17 sampled eurasian/mediterranean populations saw absolute population minimums at approx. 4.2 kya and 13kya.

    The Younger Dryas bottleneck has skewed the view of the peopling of the new world.
    The “mad dash” scenario is in fact the REPOPULATION of the new world after the die off.

    E.P. Grondine, the event is recalled in the mythos of various California groups and Meso American groups as well.

  3. Hi anonymous –

    Yes, I know. I assembled a collection of the memories, which I sent to George for distribution..
    I enjoyed the northern California peoples’ memories of survivng on the Alviso mud flats…

  4. Well, George, sorry that you feel that way. Thank you very much for your pointing out here on your site the recovery of Hibben’s field work notes . I put up with crap for several months defending him.

    But as I leave you remember that most geologists think that by 10,850 BCE the ice sheet had retreated far to the north of your hypothesized impact point. You would have to go back 2,000 years or so earlier to have ice there. Say about the time of meltwater pulse 1A.

    I look forward to the geological dates for the Carolina Bays. My guess is that they may be perhaps about 13,800 BCE, but we’ll see.

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