Three of Four Clovis Sites RADIOACTIVE according to Haynes et. al.

I’m reading the recent Vance Haynes paper and there is much on which to comment.  But this caught my eye and I just had to share.

Haynes et. al. took the surprising step of analyzing the sediment profile above and below the layer where the last of the first Clovis indians are found — for radiation.   At three of the four sites there was a distinct and inexplicable peak in radiation at the brief time the clovis occupied the site.

Here is Haynes et.a al. explanation of the anomoly:

The Murray Springs Clovis site, Pleistocene extinction, and the question of extraterrestrial impact  P.4

Radiation Anomaly. Radiation background varied from 22 cpm atMurray Springs to 22.7 cpm at Blackwater Draw. By placing theGeiger tube window against the stratigraphic surface counts rangedfrom a low of 18 cpm to a high of 37 cpm at Murray SpringsTrench 22 North (Fig. 5B). The Clovis surface (F2∕D1 contact)measured 27 cpm. At Profile B1, only three counts were made,giving readings of 25 cpm at the Clovis surface (F2a1∕F1),27 cpm at 10 cm above, and 22 cpm at 10 cm below (Fig. 5A).At Blackwater Draw, radiation ranged from 18 to 37.6 cpm,with the highest reading being at the Clovis occupation surface(strata D/C contact) on the basis of the average of five individual1-min counts (Fig. 5C). However, as Fitting (24) reported, uraniummineralization in bones at the Blackwater Draw Clovis siteis due to ground water mineralization and not confined to anystratigraphic contact. The Sheaman site results (Fig. 5D) variedfrom 20 to 31 cpm across the Clovis surface (strata D/C contact).The higher readings at all of these sites are probably due to variationsin detrital radioactive minerals such as allanite or monazite(25). Variations from 0.5 to 2.0 times background counts donot appear to be anomalous.

Radioactive