Exploring abrupt climate change induced by comets and asteroids during human history

Search Results for: carolina bay

Arabia Bay sediments to be tested by Georgia High School
Want to know a sure-fire formula to get long time internet friends together in person — and even outdoors on a blazing August day? Dig up a perfectly featured Carolina Bay. Long time Carolina bay enthusiasts, digital buddies of the Tusk, and curious citizens, Chris Cotrell, Antonio Zamora, Michael Davias, Micah Hanks and Jason…
What I REALLY think
In the weeks following the Hiawatha Crater discovery, I took the opportunity to post a personal note concerning the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis on my Facebook page. Deeper in the thread as a result of some comments I took the opportunity to give my “2018 take” on the Carolina bays. Here is my comment,…
Click here for a public link to the file The Tusk has had several requests for Carolina Bay images lately, including drone video for a forthcoming episode of “What On Earth?”, the most popular show on Discovery Science. In the process of putting my material together in one place, I realized how cool it…
A. Zamora The Tusk was absolutely thrilled to see the publication last week of a paper concerning Carolina Bays in the distinguished journal, Geomorphology. Other than a brief role for the Carolina bays in the early papers of the Comet Research Group, and a much longer series of Geological Society of America posters laboriously…
Restored from the library fire 1/1/20
Davias calls out “Wind and Wave” formation theory Michael Davias of Cintos.org presented another astonishing Carolina Bay poster at the October, 2013, Denver meeting of the Geological Society of America. My apologies to bay fans for not posting this earlier. Here is the direct download from GSA. I speculate that the robustly repetitive Carolina bays…
Restored from the library fire 1/11/20
  Isn’t it astonishing that all these secrets have been preserved for so many years just so we could discover them!! — Wilbur Wright, June, 1903   No one has yet invented an explanation which will fully account for all the facts observed – Douglas Johnson, regarding Carolina bays, 1942   The Geological Society of America…
But some bays have no peat! “Analysis reveals that, unlike typical, peat-rich Carolina Bays, Howard Bay essentially lacks peat, diatoms, pollen, and other organic materials, and it also lacks substantial silt and clay. That suggests this Bay never held water for a sustained length of time. Furthermore, the presence of extensive eolian sand calls…
 
Subscribe for Updates

Tax deductible donations to the Comet Research Group can be made here