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Number of days writer Richard Kerr has failed to inform his Science readers of the confirmation of nanodiamonds at the YDB: 3 years, 7 months, and 8 days

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Very High Temp Impact Melt Products at 12.9 ka: The PNAS Abstract

 

Teaser Graphic

8 comments to Very High Temp Impact Melt Products at 12.9 ka: The PNAS Abstract

  • I’m thinkin’ most that stuff is the kind of micro-particles we should expect to see in the clouds dust, and debris, in the distal ejecta of a major impact event.

    So what about the proximal stuff from the primary impact zones? Where’s the mother load? What do we expect those materials to consist of?

    Do we expect that after less than 13,000 years, all of the planetary scarring of the most violent extinction level impact event in 65 million years has eroded away without a trace? Of do we expect that after such a short period of geologic time those blast-effected materials exist in almost pristine condition but have mis-defined by geologists of the past as volcanogenic, or something else?

    No one would ever make the mistake of thinking that the beautiful and clear Libyan Desert Glass is volcanogenic. There, the target surface was clean silicate sand. But what do we expect of a similar airburst event if the target surface is normal alluvium, and soils? Or to complicate things even more, what if the target surface were volcanogenic materials in a volcanically active zone?

    In the 10 cm thick impact layer at lake Cuitzeo we see materials that are consistent with a hypervelocity object much bigger than the one that produced the LDG passing almost directly overhead. And that something must have been well down into the atmosphere as it passed over. This means that at least one of the primary impact zones must be within a couple hundred miles of Lake Cuitzeo. The problem there is that everywhere within that distance from the lake qualifies as a volcanic zone.

    The question becomes: If terrestrial materials bearing unmistakable chemistry of volcanism get remelted, or reworked, by a large airburst event without involving shock metamorphism, how does the re-melting change them? What do we expect the markers might be that will set those materials apart from normal, unaltered volcanogenic lavas, and pyroclastic breccias?

  • Steve Garcia

    I hate freaking abstracts. And paywalls. Paywalls not because I am cheap, but I flat out don’t understand how we taxpayers can’t have access to non-confidential research our taxes paid for. And how they still have paywalls on research done 60-75 years ago.

  • Steve Garcia

    Dennis -
    “But what do we expect of a similar airburst event if the target surface is normal alluvium, and soils? Or to complicate things even more, what if the target surface were volcanogenic materials in a volcanically active zone?”

    I still maintain that the so-called vitrified forts of the UK and Europe look like your air burst melted cerros – over regular soils mostly. No one would maintain that the hill forts are volcanogenic. Especially since there seem to be human structure on some of them (but not all, not at all).

    With their apparent alignments more or less parallel (not dissimilar to the CBs, but in a different direction), they look like a one-off event. The vitrified forts have mystified everyone so far. This may be the explanation for them.

    PREDICTION: The temps needed to vitrify the ‘hill forts’ will be shown to be in the same range as the SLOs in this study.

  • Steve Garcia

    BTW, the vitrified forts are essentially in the same areas where neolithic spirals are found.

    PREDICTION: The neolithic spirals will be prove in time to be depictions of incoming comets/fragments.

  • Barry Weathersby

    “BTW, the vitrified forts are essentially in the same areas where neolithic spirals are found.
    PREDICTION: The neolithic spirals will be prove in time to be depictions of incoming comets/fragments.”

    I have believed that since I have been reading this blog. I have seen many pictograph spirals in the western U.S. deserts and am convinced they are a depiction of a comet viewed from the earth with the sun behind us. Also the origin of the swastika like image from Native America.

  • Hello to all

    Yes, homonymous words may have quite different meanings. The pictorial elements may also have varied meanings.

    For me, among other things, the “spiral” when associated with other elements to form “sentences” can mean dynamic elements in motion. To me it look more like meteors. In some cases these elements seem to be more explicit. The rock art is an important source in the investigation of meteoritic events in every continent.

    https://sites.google.com/site/cosmopier/rock-art-and-palaeolagoons

    Good to know is that the fronts are converging. The impactites (spherules, etc) are also out there, everywhere.

    regards
    pierson

  • George Howard

    Thanks, Barry. I need to put up some cool pictographs.

    By the way, the new paper is now available on the front page.

  • Steve Garcia

    @Barry:

    I have believed that since I have been reading this blog. I have seen many pictograph spirals in the western U.S. deserts and am convinced they are a depiction of a comet viewed from the earth with the sun behind us. Also the origin of the swastika like image from Native America.

    Agreed. I was only able to find two SW USA spirals. One was outside Santa Fe, the other in AZ, but I can’t recall where.

    One of my angles on this is that between the UK in the east and Mexico/NM/AZ in the west the main land where these exist is the eastern and central USA, which were the likely devastated areas by a possible Saginaw/Great Lakes ice sheet impact.

    This may not hold out as true evidence, but it seems supportive of that impact and what we are discovering about it.

    Based on at least some accounts, the events of that time were described as (paraphrased) “the sun fell apart (or broke apart)”. That implies an impact in the daytime (as viewed from those locations). If all of those areas saw the same spiraling, then we can form an idea of its trajectory and the time of day. If it was a Taurid fragment, we also know the time of year – the end of June or early July. Not that this derivation is important – it isn’t – but it also ties in with the food in Siberian mammoths mouths or stomaches. It seems consistent that Northern Siberia would seem to have plants flowering in late June. Certainly it is the most likely time for plants to thrive.

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